Zoller|Biacsi Co., LPA
216-298-1186
Toll free877-858-5298
View Blog Navigation

divorce Archives

Shared Parenting Plans

A Shared Parenting Plan, also known as "SPP," is a detailed document which addresses the many different areas of care for the children whose parents are divorcing. Contrary to common belief, it is not simply a 50/50 visitation or "possessory time" plan.

It's not over, until it's over ...

Many recently divorced people become frustrated after their "final" hearing because their case still requires legal work. Every case is different. However, many cases resolve with the requirement that certain accounts are equalized as of a certain date. Collecting and exchanging statements or other account information can take some time. Reaching additional, post decree agreements about the settlement of those accounts can also take some time. The momentum for buttoning up these details is often lost once the Judge grants the divorce.

IT Security in Family Law Matters

A contested family law matter brings about certain IT security risks that may not seem obvious now, but may present grave problems in the future if they are overlooked. As family law attorneys, our job is to alert our clients - and potential clients - to these risks. Consider the following suggestions: 

What to Expect at the Final Dissolution Hearing

The dissolution hearing is the final step in the process of dissolving a marriage. Agreements have been reached through counsel or mediation, and the hearing simply puts the agreements into place, making them legally enforceable.  Prior to the hearing, you will have reviewed the Judgment Entry. This is the document that the Court will sign incorporating your agreements and adopting them as a court order. If there are children, both spouses will be required to attend a Parenting Seminar, and it must be attended prior to the hearing. If you receive a certificate of attendance, you will want to provide that to your attorney prior to the hearing so she can file it with the Court.

When Parenting Comes Lately

Many divorcing parents are surprised to learn that their spouse, when faced with daily separation from the children, seems to suddenly take interest in mundane parenting tasks like filling prescriptions and attending regular dental checkups. Take, for example, this recent conversation between parents:

The Resiliency of the Human Spirit

Over the past 26 years of practicing family law, I have witnessed many clients walk into my office looking torn, broken and in complete despair. The pain in a person's heart and soul seems to ooze out of their pores. The energy of their pain is palpable. It is not easy to be witness to so much pain and sadness. The human spirit, however, is resilient. And as time goes by, as the process moves forward and IF the client is doing what he/she needs to do to take care of himself or herself, the wounds start to heal. The torn and broken pieces start to be put back together, and despair is replaced with HOPE! While this may be a s-l-o-w process - it can and does happen. The transformation is incredible to witness. The client, once broken and despairing, months later appears happy and healthy. The difference in appearance is truly astonishing. I went through this sort of metamorphosis myself, never thinking I would recover and be happy again - not thinking it was possible. However, I know it is! Through personal and professional experiences, I have experienced it and seen it, over and over. There is always hope that tomorrow may be better. The pain will subside. A new normal will emerge. There is ALWAYS hope!

"We All Matter"

The recent suicide of a close friend brings this tragic topic back to my attention and to the subject of this blog. When my friend died, he was unemployed, involved in a divorce and had his two boys, one with special needs, in two different states. I knew him as a cheerful, accomplished, loving man. He was one of those people who always had a twinkle in his eyes. Now he is gone. His parents, family, friends and extended family are probably wondering what they could have or should have done to help him and avoid this senseless loss.

Back To Top